Bristol taxi driver Dean Clarke saves passenger’s life with CPR

When taxi driver Dean Clarke picked up his last fare on Saturday night, he never imagined by the time the journey ended he would have saved a life. But when a 76-year-old passenger collapsed and began having a heart attack, his instincts kicked in along with advice picked up from an advertising campaign.

Mr Clarke, who has been a taxi driver for Bristol-based Homesafe Cars for two years, administered emergency CPR to John Alexander for 20 minutes, despite having no previous first aid experience. And the technique he used to save his passengers life were gleaned from watching a campaign backed by soccer hardman Vinnie Jones. In the Staying Alive advert the footballer turned actor demonstrates how to administer CPR accompanied by the Bee Gees’ hit of the same name.

The 54-year-old was helping the man and his wife out of the taxi outside their Hanham home after they had been to a pub in Cadbury Heath celebrating their son’s birthday. Mr Clarke said: “As I helped the man out of the car, he collapsed back. It was really frightening, I rang an ambulance and told them what was happening. They talked me through some basic CPR and I just had to keep his head back and his airways open.

“I had never done CPR before, the only knowledge I had of it was from the Vinny Jones’ CPR videos. The man on the phone was great, if it wasn’t for him I wouldn’t have been able to do anything.” Mr Clarke also rang his colleague to go back to the pub and pick up the man’s son. After 20 minutes, an ambulance arrived to take the man to hospital where he was treated.

Paramedics told Dean if it wasn’t for the CPR he administered, the man may not have survived.

He said: “They said I helped save the man’s life, but if it wasn’t for the people at the end of the phone talking me through I wouldn’t have been able to do any of it, so I owe it to them really. I’m just so glad to hear the man is ok, miraculously he is out of hospital already and doing well I hear so that is all that matters. I was very anxious on Sunday until I heard he was OK. I don’t feel like I’ve done anything out of the ordinary, I was just doing my job and what anyone would have done. But it was a very frightening experience and I’m just glad it has been a positive outcome.”

The manager of Homesafe Taxis Mark Horman said: “It’s amazing really what he did and we are very proud to have him as one of our taxi drivers. He went above and beyond and we are just pleased that the man is OK and out of hospital. His family have been in touch with us through our Facebook page and have thanked us.” Aide White said on the Facebook page: “Thanks guys, this is my father-in-law of 35 years. You lived up to your company’s name, Homesafe. You did a great job.”

Daughter Louise White said: “Thank you very much this customer is my Dad we have just picked him up from hospital and apart from bruising and a chest infection he is OK as a family we can not thank you enough. My mum and dad will be in contact with you soon thanks again.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.westerndailypress.co.uk

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Norfolk mother’s praise for ‘guardian angel’ whose first aid skills helped save four-week-old baby

A mother-of-three is urging people to have first aid training, after a “guardian angel” neighbour helped save the life of her four-week old baby when he stopped breathing.

Tina Westlake, 34, said her son Kane, now eight weeks old, “wouldn’t be here” were it not for the actions of 24-year-old Emily White who administered emergency first aid she had recently learnt and carried out CPR until paramedics arrived.

Kane stopped breathing after choking on milk after being laid down for a sleep at the family home in Foulsham, prompting a panic-striken Mrs Westlake to run out into the street to scream for help, carrying her son in her arms.

Neighbour Mrs White, who was on her way to pick her daughter Jorgie up from school, heard the screams and ran back to put into practice skills picked up at a course run by First Aid at Work Norfolk, based at Ringland Road in Taverham.

The mother-of-two, who went on the course to help her secure a job as a first-aider for Fakenham-based Med PTS, said the “excellent” training she received meant she was able to calmly deal with the unfolding emergency.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.edp24.co.uk

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Rugby Dog Training Club

LogoDuncan Parsonage from Abacus Training recently delivered a CPR and defibrillator session for Rugby Dog Training Club. The Dog Training Club have had a defibrillator available to them for quite some time, as they recognised the need for early CPR and defibrillation several years ago.

A very enjoyable night was had by all those that took part (as you can see from some of the photos). From a serious and potentially life saving subject came great team work, communication and fun. Excellent feedback was received from the participants, who thoroughly enjoyed the course.

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Wearable vest defibrillator for heart patients is saving lives

Debra Chaffin, 59, was at risk for a sudden cardiac arrest, but fortunately she had the protection of a wearable defibrillator, a white undergarment that she credits with saving her life.
Facts

Eleven days after she was diagnosed with a weak heart, she was outfitted with a LifeVest she wore under her shirt.

The vest was a tight squeeze, but proved its worth on Nov. 9, 2014, when Debra started feeling nauseous.

She recalled lying down to rest and sending out a grandson for a sandwich, thinking she would feel better once she had something to eat.

“All I knew something was not right, something was wrong,” Chaffin said.

She soon lost consciousness.

The LifeVest, however, was not missing a beat, detecting a “ventricular fibrillation,” when the heart beats so rapidly that it shakes instead of delivering blood to the organs. The arrhythmia can be fatal if not treated quickly, said Dr. Ashraf Elsakr, her cardiologist with Advanced Cardiology in Port Orange.

The LifeVest delivered a shock that restored Debra’s normal heart function within a minute of detecting the arrhythmia. A gel was also released to improve the treatment and protect the skin.

The LifeVest delivered the shock without any bystander intervention except for older brother, Dana Morris, calling for an ambulance.

“She turned blue like a Smurf,” Morris recalled. “(I knew) that device went off. I called 9-1-1. It wasn’t a question.”

Debra was taken to Halifax Health Medical Center. Twelve family members followed her there.

The big group was a little bit intimidating for Elsakr, he recalled.

“I thought I better treat her right,” the doctor joked.

Morris was impressed how quickly the doctor took charge when Debra started having more attacks of ventricular fibrillation.

“Some family (members) collapsed and thought that was it,” Morris said. “That was when Capt. Kirk saved her.”

Morris compared Elsakr to the “Star Trek” commander because he looked like “Capt. Kirk at the console. ‘Spock, get me the reading on this. Uhura, get me this.’”

Elsakr said he recognized at the time that Debra needed a more permanent solution, an implantable defibrillator.

“There was no point in waiting,” Elsakr said.

The LifeVest had been a temporary solution, like a life preserver that keeps someone afloat in the ocean until the rescue boat arrives.

Another metaphor is that the LifeVest is considered a “bridge therapy.”

Once a heart condition is detected, insurance requirements typically mandates a waiting period of a few weeks to a few months to determine the best course of treatment, Elsakr explained.

The idea is to avoid rushing into something that is not best for the patient. Some patients will improve with a change in lifestyle and may not need an invasive procedure.

“It’s more or less appropriate to wait,” Elsakr said. “A lot of patients do get better. “

“I’m a believer that there are causes for everything,” he added. “You should try to seek the cause for the problem before you fix anything.”

Elsakr said Debra’s situation was complicated because she had an underlying lung condition.

To make sure she was safe, Elsakr prescribed her the LifeVest, which her insurance covered.

She had to wear it 24 hours a day, except for the shower. Sometimes she took it off when nobody else was around. It felt a little snug, she said.

The LifeVest also works as a heart monitor. An online patient management system allows clinicians to access patient data downloaded from the wearable defibrillator.

Manufactured by Zoll, a Pittsburgh-based company, it has been on the market since it was approved by the Food & Drug Administration in 2001.

Debra had not heard of the vest until Elsakr prescribed it for her. She would recommend it to anybody.

“You don’t want to lose your mom, your dad,” Debra said. “That’s what life is all about, family.”

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.news-journalonline.com

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Thousands of cardiac arrest victims die needlessly

A new survey has found almost a fifth of Brits don’t know what it is and 45 per cent are not confident enough to perform it

Thousands of Brits are needlessly dying from cardiac arrests because too many people have no idea how to perform CPR, experts warn.

A new study has found that almost a fifth of Brits – 18% – do not know what CPR is and 60% have never been trained how to do it.

Experts say that if CPR was made compulsory at secondary schools, up to 5,000 lives a year could be saved.

Catherine Kelly, director of prevention, survival and support at the British Heart Foundation, said: “In the UK, less than 1 in 10 people survive an out of hospital cardiac arrest.

“However in Norway, where CPR is taught in secondary schools, the survival figure is as high as one in four.

“That’s why it’s the BHF’s ambition to teach CPR to all young people in secondary schools across the UK.

“Training secondary school children in CPR could help to save lives. If we achieve the survival rates seen in countries where secondary school training is mandatory we could contribute to helping save an additional 5,000 lives each year.”

The research by ITV’s Good Morning Britain reveals that just under half – 45% – of us do not feel confident to carry out CPR on someone who has had a cardiac arrest.

A third – 35% – said they would be worried that attempting CPR could make things worse.

The OnePoll survey for Good Morning Britain was commissioned to launch of the Heels 4 Hearts campaign, which aims to give pupils in UK secondary schools and sixth forms the opportunity to learn CPR.

Heels 4 Hearts, which is supported by the British Heart Foundation, aims to encourage the public to donate unwanted shoes to BHF shops during the campaign. Money raised by the shoes will help fund CPR kits for schools.

Throughout this week on Good Morning Britain, presenters will hear from people whose lives have been saved by CPR, meet pupils who are being taught CPR skills and interview celebrities with personal experience of heart disease.

Other findings from the survey of 5,000 people revealed that eight out of ten – 83% – people agree it should be compulsory to learn CPR in school.

Also 40% of those asked believed ovarian or breast cancer was the biggest single killer of women when in fact coronary heart disease kills three times as many women as breast cancer.

Celebrities including Sir Tom Jones, Dame Kelly Holmes and Dame Helen Mirren have already pledged their support for Heels 4 Hearts and will be donating shoes to the campaign.

Ms Kelly, of the BHF, added: “It’s shocking that 60% of the population have not been trained in CPR and that 45% do not feel confident to carry out CPR on someone who has had a cardiac arrest.

“Knowing how to react when you’re faced with a cardiac arrest can mean the difference between life and death. That’s why we’re urging everyone to donate their unwanted shoes to the Heels 4 Hearts campaign which will go towards funding CPR kits for secondary schools in the UK.”

Good Morning Britain’s Dr Hilary Jones said: “These findings don’t surpriseme but are disappointing because being able to carry out CPR undoubtedly saves lives and is so easy to do.

“In countries where it is taught in schools people who need CPR have more than double the chance of surviving a cardiac arrest then in the UK despite heart disease being the biggest killer in our country.

“Learning CPR and having a simple to use defibrillator in public places would make a huge difference to heart attack outcomes. I am passionate about this campaign and together we can all make a difference and become lifesavers.”

Source: www.mirror.co.uk

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First aid training will be compulsory for all nursery staff | Nursery World

The plans are in response to a campaign by Joanne and Dan Thompson, whose daughter Millie died after choking at a nursery in 2012.

More than 100,000 people signed the couple’s online petition calling for compulsory first aid training.

All Level 2 and Level 3 staff will be required to have an emergency paediatric first aid or a full paediatric first aid certificate if they are to count towards the staff-qualification ratios in the EYFS. Currently early years providers must have one first-aider on the premises at all times.

The emergency first aid training course would be equivalent to one day’s training and will need to be refreshed by staff every three years to count towards the ratios.

The Thompsons have also given their backing to a new first aid certificate in memory of their daughter.

Early years settings will be able to display ‘Millie’s Mark’ as a sign of gold-standard provision.

The DfE will look into how this would be awarded and its scope, and the scheme is expected to run from early next year.

A consultation on the training proposals will take place during the next Parliament and they are expected to come into effect by September 2016.

The National Day Nurseries Association has also developed guidance and case studies with funding from the DfE.

The Government has also extended a special deal, previously only available to schools, to enable private and voluntary providers and out-of-school and holiday clubs, to buy defibrillators at a reduced cost.

Childcare and education minister Sam Gyimah said, ‘Today’s proposals will mean that thousands more staff will be able to respond to emergencies more quickly, making sure parents really can access the very best possible childcare choices for their families.

‘Not only will this help ensure children are safe while they learn, grow and develop, but it will also raise the quality and skills of the early years workforce to help them deal with day to day first aid issues such allergies and knowing when to call parents.’

Source: www.nurseryworld.co.uk

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Every school in Edinburgh to get defibrillators

EVERY high school in the Capital will be equipped with a life-saving defibrillator to ensure that thousands of teenagers never suffer the terrible fate of teenage footballer Jamie Skinner.

City chiefs have teamed up with the Scottish Ambulance Service to spend more than £34,000 on the vital devices for all 23 secondary schools in Edinburgh, following months of campaigning by the Skinner family and the Evening News.

The move has been hailed as a “great legacy” for super-fit Jamie, who suffered a fatal cardiac arrest while making his debut for Tynecastle FC at Saughton in December 2013.

His heartbroken family has fought tirelessly for better defibrillator provision, teaming up with the News to launch the Shockingly Easy campaign in July to ensure the heart-start machines are installed in every sports club in the Lothians.

Source: www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com

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Faulty heart defibrillators costing lives, monitoring agency warns

Up to a quarter of defibrillators installed in public places don’t work, according to the agency in charge of registering the equipment.

The Automated External Defibrillator Deployment Agency has launched a new set of guidelines in an effort to stop flat batteries and software malfunctions in the units.

The agency’s Graeme Pell said electronic defibrillators in workplaces, sporting clubs and other public places did not always work.

“There’s nothing more frustrating than coming across somebody who’s got a sudden cardiac arrest who clearly needs urgent defibrillation to save their lives and find that the defibrillator that you have in your hand, or in fact can’t locate, simply won’t do the job,” he said.

In the United States, research has found that up to a quarter of equipment installed in public areas at any time did not work because of flat batteries, damage or software malfunctions.

Mr Peel estimated the figures were similar in Australia. “Probably 20 to 25 per cent of defibrillators aren’t working,” he said. “We also know that unless you get fibrillation on a sudden cardiac arrest patient within the first couple of minutes, then their chance of survival is very remote. “Anecdotally, we believe that there probably are people dying unnecessarily.” Up to 33,000 Australians die from sudden cardiac arrest every year.

The agency today released a set of guidelines that helps businesses and organisations make sure equipment was ready for use in an emergency. It is also setting a up voluntary register to keep track of all defibrillators around the country.

Mr Peel said there was one positive change already underway – defibrillators were becoming easier to use.

“You open it up and it talks to you. It’ll tell you pull out the pads, where the pads have to be located and connections then basically you stand back and wait,” he said.

“The battery’s got to be working, the pads have got to stick, software has got to be functioning.

“There’s been a huge amount of enthusiasm but not as much standardisation.”

Source: www.abc.net.au

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Public Access Defibrillation Underutilized in Cardiac Arrest

(HealthDay News) — In out-of-hospital (OOH) cardiac arrest, public access defibrillation (PAD) prior to ambulance arrival may be only rarely used, according to a study published online February 19 in Heart.

Charles D. Deakin, MD, from South Central Ambulance Service in Otterbourne, U.K., and colleagues ascertained the availability and effective use of PAD in all OOH cardiac arrests in Hampshire over a 12-month period. To establish the known presence of PAD, emergency calls were reviewed; in addition, a review of all known PAD locations in Hampshire was undertaken.

The researchers found that 673 known PADs were located in 278 Hampshire locations during the study period. Of the 1,035 calls confirmed as cardiac arrest, access to an automated external defibrillator was reported in 4.25% of calls (44 occasions). The automated external defibrillator was successfully retrieved and used before ambulance arrival in 1.74% of cases (18 occasions).

“This study highlights the need for both improved PAD availability and the need to improve bystander confidence in the use of these devices,” the authors write. “With survival from OOH cardiac arrest doubling in cases where PAD is used, there is a need to improve PAD availability, publicize locations and support bystanders in deploying the device.”

One author disclosed financial ties to South Central Ambulance Service and Prometheus Medical.

Source: www.empr.com

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Minister backs campaign for vital CPR lessons in schools

Schools Minister David Laws backs Mail on Sunday campaign to introduce vital CPR lessons in schools

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed campaign to add first aid to curriculum
Mr Laws became the first high-profile member of Coalition to support move
He said: ‘All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life’

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move

Every child could leave school with essential lifesaving skills after Ministers backed a Mail on Sunday campaign to add first aid to the curriculum.

Schools Minister David Laws became the first high-profile member of the Coalition to support the move, piling pressure on Education Secretary Nicky Morgan to introduce mandatory training for first aid in schools.

Mr Laws said the crucial skills should be taught as a compulsory part of Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) lessons, which also cover sex education, anti-bullying and careers advice.

The newspaper is campaigning to make sure all schools teach basic first aid techniques – simple acts that could save hundreds of thousands of lives every year. The skills can also be taught by older children to their younger peers.

Our campaign now has cross-party support and is also backed by teachers and a number of leading charities.

Mr Laws said: ‘Parents expect to see some basic standards laid out on what their children will learn in school. All children should leave school with the essential skills and knowledge that prepares them for life.

‘Liberal Democrats are clear that all schools should teach Personal, Social and Health Education, and that we would expect that to include first aid.’

Mr Laws’s statement comes after Lib Dems voted in October to include mandatory first aid training in schools in their latest manifesto.

Tory Health Minister Earl Howe has also voiced his support, saying: ‘First aid is a highly valuable, potentially lifesaving skill and I encourage schools to teach pupils first aid through their PSHE lessons.’

 

Lib Dem MP Sir Bob Russell, chairman of the all-party parliamentary group on first aid, said he hoped the other two main parties would also add the proposals to their pre-Election manifestos.

‘Mr Laws is considering these proposals,’ he said. ‘Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said he sees this as part of the preventative agenda.’

Other politicians backing the plans include Labour’s Julie Hilling and Conservative MP Anne Marie Morris.

Ms Hilling said: ‘This is as essential as learning to read or write. Learning to save a life is precious.’

Charities including St John Ambulance and the British Heart Foundation are also behind the scheme.

BHF chief executive Simon Gillespie said: ‘A future government will need to play its part by making CPR part of the curriculum – a move that already has the support of the public, teachers and doctors.’

Source: www.dailymail.co.uk

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